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 Post subject: Re: Jeffrey M. Anderson
PostPosted: April 6th, 2005, 8:54 pm 
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In the freezer
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Joined: February 10th, 2003, 1:05 am
Posts: 991
Location: Inside the beltway
<!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>True, but, if you're adapting a movie, then you should be careful to try to capture the feeling of the book, otherwise it's simply a case of you being to damn lazy to write or find original material. If the book inspired you to translate it to film, you had better be able to translate correctly.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END-->My favorite example of a great book turned into a great movie is Wonder Boys. The movie has its fair share of differences from the book, but the spirit is totally there. <p><!--EZCODE HR START--><hr /><!--EZCODE HR END--> Hey hey hey. Don't be mean. We don't have to be mean because, remember, no matter where you go, there you are. -- Buckaroo Banzai</p>


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 Post subject: never
PostPosted: April 7th, 2005, 12:44 pm 
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Sudden Death Academic Probation

Joined: February 26th, 2004, 12:53 am
Posts: 19
Like Salinger has said, Holden would never want Catcher in the Rye to be a movie. He hates movies, he hates the theatre. Let people make movies with extreme similarities ie. Igby Goes Down, but no one should be allowed to make Catcher as a film. It's more fun to see where writers and directors can go when Salinger has merely influenced them, like with Rushmore and Royal Tenenbaums, we don't need someone making a version of the book that will never be as good as the source.



(however, i would let Wes do it if he reallllly wanted to!)


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 Post subject: Re: never
PostPosted: April 7th, 2005, 1:23 pm 
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Jacked by the IRS
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Joined: February 10th, 2004, 3:12 am
Posts: 293
<!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>True, but, if you're adapting a movie, then you should be careful to try to capture the feeling of the book, otherwise it's simply a case of you being to damn lazy to write or find original material. If the book inspired you to translate it to film, you had better be able to translate correctly.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END-->

WORD! that was wondefully said, and i completely agree.

one movie that i found to be EXACTLY like the book (dialogues and all), was "the malteze falcon". i read the book the day i saw the movie, and it had the same dialogue. word by word. i think there were two or three scenes cut. then again, it was a really thin book. ;)

i don't want anyone to make CITR into a movie. it'd be against what salinger wanted, and that's just stupid. let the man be. it's not like EVERY great book MUST become a movie. why? so that stupid highschool kids can rent the tape instead of reading the book? i've heard enough of that in class, when ppl started discussing something a character did/felt in the movie version, without having read the book. they ended up looking like the morons they were. <p>____________
"...nor do I think it’s very intelligent to keep an electrical gadget on the edge of the bathtub."</p>


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 Post subject: How NOT to do it, apparently.
PostPosted: April 7th, 2005, 7:51 pm 
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Kite Flying Society

Joined: December 20th, 2001, 6:13 pm
Posts: 3137
Location: Tucson.
Just came across this abstract. Thought of you guys hashing this out.

<!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>Smack in the face
Maycock, J, Guardian; 12 Jun 1998, suppt. p.26-7
Forty years before Trainspotting, Hollywood made its first film about heroin. But lowlife chronicler Nelson Algren never recovered from what the director, Otto Preminger, did to his book, The Man with the Golden Arm. <hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END-->


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 Post subject: Re: How NOT to do it, apparently.
PostPosted: April 7th, 2005, 7:53 pm 
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Max Fischer Players

Joined: March 15th, 2004, 7:41 am
Posts: 504
Ooooh, dissed! That's Otto's most hilariously awful movie, though! Frank's performance is so cheesy! I love it! (Well, ok, love is maybe an overstatement. But I chuckle when I catch it on cable.) <p><!--EZCODE HR START--><hr /><!--EZCODE HR END-->They say the recipe for Sprite is lemon and lime, but I tried to make it at home... there's more to it than that.<!--EZCODE BR START-->
<!--EZCODE BR END-->"Want some more homemade Sprite?"<!--EZCODE BR START-->
<!--EZCODE BR END-->"Not 'til you figure out what the fuck else is in it!"</p>


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 Post subject: Re: How NOT to do it, apparently.
PostPosted: April 7th, 2005, 8:09 pm 
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Kite Flying Society

Joined: December 20th, 2001, 6:13 pm
Posts: 3137
Location: Tucson.
It's a tough topic for me. I know that people like Payne & Taylor annoy me because they seem to shave off the parts of the book that create the truest picture of the character. This was true in Election, and WAY true in Schmidt. (I wouldn't know about Sideways or Ruth, haven't read the base or original material.) I think they served their own goals when rewriting the character profiles and dialogue to conform to their medium. And when they did that, they degenerated the characters and, by extention, the story.

I admit I overcompared the book and film Schmidts, because the film was absolutely nowhere near the book; but then, I also prefer to not separate the two quite so much.

Anyway. I thought that abstract was sort of funny, because so many novels are written screen-ready these days (Grrrrisham), and they might've even had some of that back in the golden era of Hollywood (even Faulkner, who actually wrote screenplays, of others' work and adaptations of his own novels). And sometimes a novel is improved upon by the vision of a director or screenwriter or cinematographer, what have you, but it's also problematic when the film pays your book such a disservice that it affects the writers' literary careers. It's always something to consider, that interference caused by the adaptation, which has always struck me as kind of selfish on the part of the film community.

Whiner, I know. Carry on. :)


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 Post subject: Unknown
PostPosted: May 31st, 2005, 12:31 pm 
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Wants to be a Tenenbaum

Joined: May 31st, 2005, 11:07 am
Posts: 197
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: October 25th, 2006, 8:36 pm 
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Chapel Partner

Joined: October 31st, 2003, 1:17 pm
Posts: 71
Fitgerald and Hemingway, as well, seem to be big influences. But that can be said about really any American writing in their wake. Specifically, though, Fitzgerald's New York.


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